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MGH Institute of Health Professions Sponsors Sculpture Exhibit in Charlestown Navy Yard

July 01, 2020
Wind sculpture

MGH Institute of Health Professions is among the sponsors of Lyman Whitaker’s Wind on Water temporary sculpture exhibit in the Charlestown Navy Yard. The 31 sculptures, hosted by the Charlestown Navy Yard Garden Association, will be on display through May 2021. 

Internationally renowned artist Lyman Whitaker’s wind sculptures have been described as “majestic and magical,” and this installation offers the perfect opportunity for safe social distancing while walking, biking, and breathing fresh harbor breezes. Sculptures have been placed throughout the Navy Yard, with three in Shipyard Park behind the Catherine Filene Shouse Building.

“Sometime in the future, at a time when our community can safely gather, we will host a community celebration,” said Robin DiGiammarino, the garden association’s president. “For now, during this time of ongoing restrictions due to the COVID 19 pandemic, please enjoy the opportunity to experience this amazing outdoor exhibit while maintaining social distancing.”

This specially designed collection of Whitaker’s diverse kinetic sculptures comprises intricate and gracefully moving metals that will be continually propelled by the Boston Harbor’s windy micro-climate, spinning and twirling in imaginative syncopation. The custom exhibit pieces range from approximately six to 18 feet in height. They are created from a variety of metals including copper, steel, and stainless steel that spin on sealed ball bearings. 

Mr. Whitaker’s studio is near Zion National Park in Utah. The artist says he wants his sculptures to “inspire love for our earth’s thin, moving layer of air – it warms us, gives us breath, sustains our being. The undulating movements of the sculptures reflect the many moods of the wind.”