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Marjorie Nicholas, PhD, CCC-SLP, FASHA

Marjorie Nicholas
Chair, Professor
Department: 
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Phone: 
(617) 726-0685
Office Location: 
Shouse - 422

Marjorie Nicholas, PhD, CCC-SLP, FASHA, is Chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and is a professor specializing in adult neurogenic communication disorders. 

She founded the MGH Institute's onsite Aphasia Center, which provides diagnostic and treatment services to adults with aphasia and related neurological communication impairments.

Dr. Nicholas is also a research assistant professor in the Neurology Department of Boston University School of Medicine. Prior to joining the MGH Institute faculty, she was a speech-language pathologist for over 15 years at the VA Boston Healthcare System.

She has co-authored numerous research articles on aphasia, language in normal aging, and dementia and is co-author of various assessment and treatment materials for aphasia including the book, Manual of Aphasia and Aphasia Therapy (3rd edition), the Boston Assessment of Severe Aphasia (BASA), the Sentence Production Program for Aphasia (SPPA), and the C-Speak Aphasia software program.

Dr. Nicholas became a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (FASHA) in 2017.


Research Interests

Dr. Nicholas' research interests focus on the treatment of severe aphasia, and in particular on the cognitive and neuroanatomical mechanisms underlying successful use of augmentative and alternative communication systems by people with aphasia.

She also conducts research on nonverbal cognition in people with aphasia and on the relation between cognitive and linguistic impairments to quality of life in people with aphasia.

Publications

Nicholas, M. (June 2019).  Why nonverbal cognition matters in aphasia treatment. In On the Pulse column, ASHA Leader.  

Curtis, S., Nicholas, M., Pittmann, R. & Zipse, L. (2019).  Tap your hand if you feel the beat: differential effects of tapping in melodic intonation therapy.  Aphasiology.

Foley, E., Nicholas, M.L., Baum, C., & Connor, L.T. (2019).  Influence of Environmental Factors on Social Participation Post-Stroke.  Behavioural Neurology.  Volume 2019, Article ID 2606039  

Wallace, S., Worrall, L., Rose, T., Le Dorze, G.; Breitenstein, C., Enderby, P., Bose, A., Brady, M., Cruice, M., Copland, D., Hersh, D., Cherney, L., Babbitt, E., Rochon, E., Pearl, G., Hilari, K., Marshall, J., Webster, J., Kelly, H., Howe, T., Kiran, S., Nicholas, M.,  Rose, M., Sage, K., Laska, A.C., Patterson, J., Small, S. (2018). A core outcome set for aphasia treatment research: Consensus statement. International Journal of Stroke.  

Kershenbaum, A., Nicholas, M., Hunsaker, E., & Zipse, L., (2017). Speak along without the song: What promotes fluency in people with aphasia?  Aphasiology. DOI: 10.1080/02687038.2017.1413487

Nicholas, M. & Connor, L.T.  (2017).  People with aphasia using AAC: Are executive functions important? Aphasiology, 31:7, 819-836, DOI:10.1080/02687038.2016.1258539 

Nicholas, M., Hunsaker, E.  & Guarino, A.J. (2017). The relation between language, non-verbal cognition and quality of life in people with aphasia. Aphasiology, 31:6, 688-702, DOI: 10.1080/02687038.2015.1076927

Carter, A., Nicholas, M., Hunsaker, E., McCarthy-Jacobson, A. (2015).  Modified Berg Balance Scale: Making assessment appropriate for people with aphasia.  Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, Vol. 22(2),83-93 . DOI 10.1179/1074935714Z.0000000034.

Nicholas, M. & Vaughan, E. (2013). Understanding of observed video action events by people with aphasia.  Aphasiology, 27 (5), 532- 545.

See Curriculum Vitae for complete list.

PubMed has 14 Nicholas publications with abstracts.

Presentations

Nicholas, M., Pittmann, R., Pennington, S., Savastano, M., Senecal, E., Hildebrand, M., Ambrosi, D.  & Brady Wagner, L. (2018).  S-IHP’s CAP: Interprofessional intensive comprehensive aphasia program for life participation: lessons learned across three years.  Seminar at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Boston, MA.

Lovette, B., Nicholas, M., Helm-Estabrooks, N., Eichstadt, T. (2018). Why we must assess nonlinguistic cognition in people with aphasia and how to do it.  Seminar at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Boston, MA.

Wilner, A., Nicholas, M., Zipse, L., Vallila-Rohter, S. (2018). Processing of observed action events in people with aphasia (PWA). Poster at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Boston, MA.

Connor, L.T., Burch, K., Mitchell, J., Nicholas, M., Fox, A. (2018).  Participation in persons with/without aphasia compared to self perception of cognition, communication, physical function. Poster at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Boston, MA.

Czupryna, B., Zipse, L., Nicholas, M., Vallila-Rohter, S. (2018).  Investigating attentional allocation with eye tracking during category learning in people with aphasia.  Poster at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Boston, MA.

Mackey, J., Nicholas, M. & Maxwell, L. (2017). Do we (CSD Programs) truly value diversity in our students? An open discussion.  Presentation at the CAPCSD annual meeting. New Orleans, LA, April 2017.

Nicholas, M., Brady-Wagner, L., Ambrosi, D., Hunsaker, E., Pennington, S., Tierney Hendricks, C., Savastano, M., Hildebrand, M., & Felker. E.  (2016). S-IHP’s CAP: an Interprofessional intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP) based on life participation and the ICF.  Presentation at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Philadelphia, PA.

Vallila-Rohter, S., Zipse, L., & Nicholas, M. (2016).  Nonverbal cognition and aphasia: Why SLPs need to pay attention.  Presentation at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Philadelphia, PA.

Asanuma, N., Zipse, L., Pennington, S., & Nicholas, M. (2016).  Auditory Selective Attention Deficits in Mild-Moderate Aphasia: Relation to Formally-Tested And Self-Reported Auditory Comprehension Impairments. Poster at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention, Philadelphia, PA.


Education

BA, Linguistics, Brown University, Providence, RI
MS, Communication Disorders, Boston University, Boston, MA
PhD, Communication Disorders, Emerson College, Boston, MA

Curriculum Vitae