The Latest from the Blogs

PEBT

October 29, 2014

Dining with Dysphagia.

Dysdine is a website maintained by students from the MGH Institute of Health Professions designed to provide recipes, encouragement, and community to those living with dysphagia . On the webpage, a visitor can find a recipe database separated by diet-texture and category, a list of reviewed restaurants with diet based menu suggestions, and stories of inspiration from others who also have swallowing difficulties. The website was originally started by Shaina Sawyer (CSD class ’13), and has been gaining viewership and slowly building its territory in the online healthcare network. Currently,...
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October 10, 2014

Happy PA Week!

Happy PA Week from your newly accredited MGH Institute PA program! The PA profession was "born" in the mid-1960s thanks to the vision of Dr. Eugene Stead and the skills and commitment of the veterans, corpsmen and medics, who took a leap of faith in joining the very first class of PAs. In the 20 years since I graduated from my PA program, I have had the distinct pleasure of watching my beloved profession grow in scope, numbers, and recognition. When I took my first job as a PA educator, there were approximately 90 accredited programs in the country. Today, there are 190 accredited PA programs...
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April 14, 2014

Add Medical Interpreters to the Health Care Team

* This article originally appeared on AAPA's PAs Connect blog. We need to expand our definition of healthcare team when it comes to patients with limited English proficiency. I was reminded of this after reading a March 17 article on Multibriefs.com, “ Multilingual healthcare providers for a multilingual nation. ” Author Jon Jilani makes a convincing and important argument for the use of competent, trained medical interpreters when providing care to non-English-speaking patients. The article spoke to the likelihood of poor health outcomes when using ad hoc interpreters, such as family members...
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April 8, 2014

Yet Another Reason to Freeze

Just as our bodies have begun to thaw out, and the thought of removing our mittens to send texts while waiting for the T no longer seems like cruel and unusual punishment, our friends at Ben and Jerry’s have taken it upon themselves to make sure the reminder of winter lingers a little longer. Today, April 8, from noon-8 p.m. Ben & Jerry’s will host their annual #FreeConeDay to celebrate their 35th anniversary. The tasty tradition originally started in Burlington, VT in 1979 and has since grown to be a nationwide celebration. So whether you are dipping out of work or are in need of a break...
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February 10, 2014

Admissions Spotlight: Master of Science in Physical Therapy for International Students Program

Admissions Spotlight: Master of Science in Physical Therapy for International Students Online application deadline: March 1, 2014 – Fall 2014 admission About the program: Designed for physical therapists who completed their physical therapy education in another country, our Master of Science in Physical Therapy program offers training that will prepare students for the next step in their careers. Offering an interprofessional mix of evidence-based academics and targeted clinical experience, the program enables foreign-trained therapists to hone core skills in critical inquiry, and basic,...
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January 31, 2014

Tears of Joy: Google’s “Smart” Contact Lens Glucometer

The dreaded finger stick. Every nursing student remembers performing their first one on a patient. It involves a spring-loaded sharp lancet which pricks a small hole in the patient’s finger, from which a drop of blood is drawn and tested for its blood sugar level with a handheld device. It’s a way of life for many diabetics, who may require testing their blood sugar several times a day. This means enduring thousands of finger sticks over the course of years, a cumbersome and painful reminder of this chronic disease. However, this invasive test may become a thing of the past. Yesterday, Google...
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January 31, 2014

Kasturba Hospital and the Yoga Center

The five of us got to tour Kasturba Hospital in Manipal. The hospital is huge. It has 2250 beds (MGH is 950 to give you a comparison) and 24 ICUs. The hallways and registration areas are VERY crowded, dark, and dirty. Certain ramps had laundry hanging from the railings. Although they are technically not allowed to, many families sleep here. We toured several of the ICUs, an outpatient dialysis unit, and several of the general medical wards. About 80-90% of the dialysis patients are diabetics. This is a major medical problem in India. We were surprised to find the ICUs were in MUCH better...
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January 31, 2014

Temples of Karnataka

Namaste! [a Hindi greeting]. While in India, we've done our best to explore the local temples, as religion is a major part of the culture and everyday life. The majority of people practice Hinduism but there are also Christians and Jains in Karnataka (the Indian state we're living in). Temple sign written in Kannada, the local language Hindu temple on campus You must remove shoes before entering Sri Krishna Temple in Udupi, a nearby town Bathing pools at Sri Krishna Temple These structures are pulled by elephants during festivals Chalk is applied to the upper forehead before worship We also...
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January 31, 2014

Origins of "The Talking Drum"

I broke my first curfew the night I was born in Dakar, Sénégal. The year was 1989, and mounting civil unrest along the lush river border between Sénégal and Mauritania had resulted in a Senegalese man’s death. Subsequently, Mauritanians living in Sénégal became targets of revenge. Enraged Senegalese overturned Mauritanian-owned shops and threatened worse damage. In an effort to contain the attacks, Senegalese law enforcement issued a 10 P.M. curfew in Dakar, after which time anyone could be arrested for being caught outside without the proper paperwork. Enter my very pregnant mother and her...
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January 21, 2014

Community Health and Morbidity Clinic near Manipal, India. IHP students reach Malpe!

On our third week in Manipal, we had the opportunity to attend a community health clinic design for second year BSc students. The professors assigned two different families to each student; within the next few weeks, the students have to interview patients, gather both subjective and objective data, and then create a plan of care. We tagged along with some of the students, and gathered some information for our scholarly projects. Leah Rubin RN-NP student '14 and Kristen Palleo RN-NP student 14' had the opportunity to interview a pregnant nurse and gather information about pre-natal care...
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