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Jarrad H. Van Stan, PhD, CCC-SLP

Jarrad Van Stan

 

Jarrad H. Van Stan, PhD, CCC-SLP

PhD '16

 

What year did you start the program? 2012

 

 

Jarrad is a Research Speech-Language Pathologist and Senior Clinical Research Coordinator in the Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation at Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Surgery. He is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the MGH Institute.

What are your prior degrees and at which institutions?
Bachelor of Music, Performance Voice, University of Delaware, 2005
MA, Communication Science and Disorders, Temple University, 2005

What was your research setting during the PhD program?
Mentor:
Robert E Hillman, PhD, CCC-SLPCo-Director/Research Director
Lab: http://www.massgeneral.org/voicecenter/On

On what was your research focused?
Diagnosis and treatment of voice disorders using ambulatory voice monitoring and motor learning/control perspectives.

What was your dissertation title?
Performance and Retention of a Modified Vocal Behavior Using Ambulatory Voice Bio-feedback and Motor Learning Principles in Subjects with Normal Voices

What publications or external presentations have you produced since the start of your PhD program?
Publications (in chronological order)
Peer Reviewed:
Zanca JM, Turkstra LS, Chen C, Packel A, Ferraro M, Hart T, Van Stan JH , Whyte J, Dijkers MP:"Advancing Rehabilitation Practice through Improved Specification of Interventions." Archives of Physical Medical and Rehabilitation.

Hart T, Dijkers MP, Whyte J, Turkstra LS, Zanca JM, Packel A, Van Stan JH, Ferraro M & Chen, C: "A Theory-Driven System for the Specification of Rehabilitation Treatments." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Van Stan JH, Dijers MP, Whyte J, Hart T, Turkstra LS, Zanca J & Chen C: "The Rehabilitation Treatment Specification System: Implications for Improvements in Research Design, Reporting, Replication, and Synthesis." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Whyte J, Dijers MP, Hart T, Van Stan JH, Packel A, Turkstra LS, Zanca J, Chen C & Ferraro, M: "The Importance of Voluntary Behavior in Rehabilitation Treatment and Outcomes." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

M. Ghassemi, J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, M. Zañartu, H. A. Cheyne II, R. E. Hillman, J. V. Guttag (2014). Learning to detect vocal hyperfunction from ambulatory neck-surface acceleration features: Initial results for vocal fold nodules. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 61(6), 1668–1675

J. H. Van Stan, J. Gustafsson, E. Shalling, R. E. Hillman (2014). Direct comparison of commercially available ambulatory voice monitors: A clinical perspective. SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice & Voice Disorders, 24(2), 80-86.

J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, & R. E. Hillman (2015). The effect of ambulatory biofeedback on the performance and retention of a vocal motor skill in daily life. Journal of Speech Language & Hearing Research, 58, 713-721
 
J. H. Van Stan, N. Roy, S. Awan, J. Stemple, R. E. Hillman (2015). A voice therapy taxonomy. American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, 24, 101-125

J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, S. M. Zeitels, J. A. Burns, A. M. Barbu, & R. E. Hillman (2015). Average ambulatory measures of sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, and vocal dose do not differ between adult females with phonotraumatic lesions and matched control subjects. Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, 124, 864-874

D. D. Mehta, J. H. Van Stan, & R. E. Hillman (In Revision). Relationships between voice quality measures derived from an acoustic microphone and a sub glottal neck-surface accelerometer. IEEE Transactions on Audio, Speech and Language Processing.

Book Chapters:
T. Stadelman-Cohen, J. H. Van Stan, R. E. Hillman (2014). Use of ambulatory biofeedback to supplement traditional voice therapy for treating primary muscle tension dysphonia in an adult female. In J. Stemple & E. Hapner (Eds.), Voice Therapy: Clinical Case Studies, 4th Edition, San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing.

Conference Presentations/Proceedings:
J. H. Van Stan, M. T. Jarvis, S.-W. Park, D. Sternad, D. D. Mehta, R. E. Hillman (2015). Development of a two-dimensional virtual environment to study variability in vocal motor learning. Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, London, England.

J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, S. M. Zeitels, J. A. Burns, A. M. Barbu, & R. E. Hillman (2015). Average ambulatory measures of sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, and vocal dose do not differ between adult females with phonotraumatic lesions and matched control subjects. Combined Otolaryngology Spring Meetings – American Broncho-Esophagological Association, Boston, MA.

J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, R. E. Hillman (2015). The development of flexible ambulatory biofeedback schedules for vocal motor learning. Occupation Voice Symposium, London, England.

J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, R. E. Hillman (2014). Effect of ambulatory biofeedback on vocal motor behavior in daily life: A pilot study. ASHA National Convention, Orlando, FL.

J. H. Van Stan, N. Roy, S. Awan, R. E. Hillman (2013). A taxonomy of voice therapy. ASHA National Convention, Chicago, IL.

J. H. Van Stan, J. Sechrist (2012). Preventative/rehabilitative dysphagia protocol for chemoradiation to the head and neck. Pennsylvania Speech-Language & Hearing Association Convention, Lancaster, PA.

H. Aljehani, J. H. Van Stan, R. E. Hillman, C. W. Haynes, D. D. Mehta (2015). Ambulatory voice monitoring of a Muslim imam during Ramadan. Voice Foundation, Philadelphia, PA.

D. D. Mehta, J. H. Van Stan, R. E. Hillman (2014). Deriving acoustic voice quality measures from subglottal neck-surface acceleration. Proceedings of the International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics, Salt Lake City, UT.

R. E. Hillman, J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, M. Zañartu, M. Ghassemi, H. A. Cheyne II, J. V. Guttag (2013). Future directions in the development of ambulatory monitoring for clinical voice assessment. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech Research, Cincinnati, OH.

D. D. Mehta, M. Zañartu, J. H. Van Stan, S. W. Feng, H. A. Cheyne II, R. E. Hillman (2013). Smartphone-based detection of voice disorders by long-term monitoring of neck acceleration features. Proceedings of the 10th Annual Body Sensor Networks Conference, Cambridge, MA

Y.-A. S. Lien, C. Calabrese, C. Michener, J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, R. E. Hillman, C. E. Stepp (2014). Relative fundamental frequency estimation via neck skin acceleration in healthy and disordered voices. ASHA National Convention, Orlando, FL.

M. Zañartu, V. Espinoza, D. D. Mehta, J. H. Van Stan, H. A. Cheyne II, M. Ghassemi, J. V. Guttag, and R. E. Hillman, (2013). Toward an objective aerodynamic assessment of vocal hyperfunction using a voice health monitor. Proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Models and Analysis of Vocal Emissions for Biomedical Applications, Firenze, Italy.

A. F. Llico, M. Zañartu, D. D. Mehta, J. H. Van Stan, H. A. Cheyne II, A. J. González, M. Ghassemi, G. R. Wodicka, J. V. Guttag, and R. E. Hillman, (2013). Incorporating real-time biofeedback capabilities into a voice health monitor. Proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Models and Analysis of Vocal Emissions for Biomedical Applications, Firenze, Italy.

Y.-A. S. Lien, C. Calabrese, C. M. Michener, E. H. Murray, J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, R. E. Hillman, J. P. Noordzij, C. E. Stepp (2015). Automated algorithms for estimation of relative fundamental frequency in individuals with and without voice disorders. Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, London, England.

M. Ghassemi, E. Shih, D. Mehta, S. Feng, J. H. Van Stan, R. Hillman, J. Guttag (2012). Detecting voice modes for vocal hyperfunction prevention. Proceedings of the 7th Annual Workshop for Women in Machine Learning, Lake Tahoe, NV.

What grants have you been awarded while in the PhD program?
NIH   4 R33DC011588-03  Robert Hillman (PI)  04/01/2012–03/31/2016
Ambulatory monitoring of vocal function to improve voice disorder assessment
The goal of this study is to develop accelerometer-based ambulatory monitoring of vocal function into a valid, reliable, and cost-effective clinical tool that can be used to accurately identify and differentiate patterns of voice use that are associated with hyperfunctional voice disorders.
Role: Research Speech Language Pathologist

NIH  1 F31DC014412-01  Jarrad Van Stan (PI)  09/01/2014–06/01/2017
The influence of ambulatory biofeedback schedules on the retention of a vocal motor behavior
Voice ambulatory biofeedback has the potential to significantly improve voice therapy effectiveness by targeting the hardest aspect of rehabilitation – carryover outside the therapy session (also known as retention). This project will use ambulatory biofeedback structures based on motor control and learning theory to attempt to improve the retention of modified vocal behaviors (decreased vocal loudness) in subjects with normal voices. Specifically, decreased frequency of feedback and summary average feedback schedules will be empirically compared to immediate 100% feedback regarding their effects on subject performance, short term retention, and long term retention.
Role: Primary Investigator

PCORI  ME-1403-14083   John Whyte (PI)   01/01/2014–12/31/2017
Better rehabilitation through better characterization of treatments: Development of the Manual for Rehabilitation Treatment Specification
The objective of this project is to develop the conceptual framework of the Rehabilitation Treatment Taxonomy (RTT) into standardized operational procedures by which clinicians, educators, and researchers across all rehabilitation disciplines may define and specify rehabilitation treatments according to their immediate effects, mechanisms of action, and hypothesized active ingredients. Thus, one tangible objective is the development, initial testing, and dissemination of a Manual for Rehabilitation Treatment Specification. A further objective, using the results of that testing, is to continue development of the RTT toward the goal of a common language and classification system for all rehabilitation interventions, thus allowing meaningful grouping of similar treatments together and meaningful comparisons across distinct treatment approaches.
Role: Consultant

What awards have you won while in the program?
ASHFoundation New Century Scholars Doctoral Scholarship 2014 Awardee

What do you think is special about the PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences program here at the MGH Institute?
The Institute’s PhD program has a clinical and practical focus throughout the field of rehabilitation sciences. It helps foster interdisciplinary research and projects that may potentially improve rehabilitation as a whole.

Why did you choose to come to this program rather than a doctoral research program in your specific profession?
The Institute’s strong affiliations with exceptional clinical institutions throughout the Boston area.

What are your goals for the future after you graduate?
My long term goals are to have a joint academic/clinical position in an academically affiliated hospital setting where I would build a very active clinical research program while also doing part-time clinical work and contributing to the teaching mission of the institution; primarily in areas related to medical speech language pathology (SLP).

  Video of Dr. Van Stan's Research